Dating colonial flat buttons

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Vintage Button Guide - Ways to Identify Antique Buttons

The button—with its self-contained roundness and infinite variability—has a quiet perfection to it. Running a cascade of buttons through your fingers feels satisfyingly heavy, like coins or candy; their clicking whoosh and blur of colors lull you. A button packs an extraordinary amount of information about a given time and place—its provenance—onto a crowded little canvas. The earliest known button, writes Ian McNeil in An Encyclopedia of the History of Technology , "was originally used more as an ornament than as a fastening, the earliest known being found at Mohenjo-daro in the Indus Valley [now Pakistan].

It is made of a curved shell and about years old. Along with brooches, buckles, and straight pins, buttons were used in ancient Rome as decorative closures for flowing garments. However, none of these options worked perfectly. Pins poked unsightly holes into precious fabrics. Supporting yards of cloth at a single point required buttons of architectural heft, made of bone, horn, bronze or wood. Some designs took the functional pressure off buttons by knotting the fabric securely into position, then topping off the look with a purely ornamental button.

Incidentally, as a button alternative, Mycenaeans of the Roman era invented the fibula, a surprisingly modern forerunner to our safety pin. This design was lost with them until it re-emerged in mid th century America. The button became more prominent among the wealthy in the Middle Ages. The first button-makers guild formed in France in Still regarded as less-than-functional jewelry, buttons were so prized that sumptuary laws restricted their use.

Books, Banks, Buttons and Other Inventions from the Middle Ages by Chiara Frugoni relates how, in a period tale, a magistrate quizzed a woman overly bedecked in buttons. The medieval period was the era when wearing lots of buttons meant big money. Along with ribbons, laces or bows, buttons were often used on detachable sleeves, a fad that ran from the 13th to 15th centuries. These sleeves could be easily swapped between outfits and laundered whenever they got dirty.

Courtiers might accept an unbuttoned sleeve from a lady as a love token, or wave sleeves in jubilation at a jousting tourney. After the Renaissance in Europe, buttons—along with many other things—became increasingly baroque, then rococo. Hollowed-out smuggler buttons allowed thieves to transport jewels and other booty secretly.

Ornate buttoning among the wealthy required some help. Around this era is when buttons migrated to different sides of a shirt for men and women. Men usually donned their own shirts, so their buttons faced right for their convenience. View years of political buttons here. Poorer folks wore buttons, too, but they had to craft them laboriously by hand. In Colonial America until the early 20 th century, working-class families counted themselves lucky if they owned a hand-held button-mold.

You heated up the mold in a bed of hot coals, then filled it with molten lead or pewter, which set into a button shape. The sturdy metal buttons could then be covered with fabric or other embellishments. Extra buttons made at home could also be sold, which meant button-making could be hellish piecework. Playwright Henrik Ibsen channeled his own awful memories of home button-molding in a pivotal scene in Peer Gynt. Button-making was mercifully accelerated with the Industrial Revolution.

An article from Household Words , a journal edited by Charles Dickens, marvels at the latter-day miracle that was automated button-manufacturing. The writer describes how engravers cut steel dies into the latest fashionable shape, while women and children stamped out pasteboard and cloth to cover the buttons by machine. A rash of button patents during this period protected nearly every aspect of button-making, from manufacturing methods for glass or mother-of-pearl buttons, cheaper wire buttons, even improvements to button display cards for sale.

With the growing number of actual buttons came a parallel growth in button metaphors in everyday speech. The OED lists several, dating from the late s to the early 20 th century: Once they became cheap enough to produce en masse, buttons by the hundreds lined most kinds of tight-fitting clothing, including shoes. More buttons, closely spaced, gave the wearer the tightest fit.

In his book The Evolution of Useful Things , Henry Petroski explains how this profusion of buttons gave rise to a parallel problem: The solution? Buttonhooks, long crochethook-like devices used to draw buttons through holes rapidly. These evolved into various styles to accommodate different button sizes.

Buttons, in other words, designate sites of vitality, embarrassment, and thrill. Later in the century, buttons migrated as a metaphor from the mechanical world to the virtual one. Buttons now adorn screens big and small, promising to connect us to marvels with a single click. Even though zippers entered the clothing-closure scene around the turn of the century, we still wear buttons today.

Reasons abound: Velcro, another new-fangled closure, is too futuristic to be taken seriously. Hook-and-eyes and laces have their adherents, but their ubiquity is nowhere near that of the button. Buttons, in short, offer everyday pleasures. Their little faces turn up agreeably, asking for personality to be impressed upon them. Buttoning oneself up is a slower, contemplative act; unbuttoning someone else, deliciously more so. Pressing buttons still delivers everything we love in the world to us.

Why would we ever phase that out? Related article: The buttons shown here, culled from the wonderfully abundant galleries at Button Country , demonstrate the wide range of materials used to make these ubiquitous fasteners. The button at top left uses glass on metal. The button at top right uses objects embedded in polyester. The lower left button is ivory, finished with decorative paint. The lower right button is jasperware.

The one on top shown front and back is made of iridescent abalone. The one on the bottom is the result of a wax-resist dye process. The seahorse is Japanese. The top one shown front and back uses woven tatting and ribbon. More in this series: Read about the book , the office chair , and other objects featured in our series on everyday design. Buttons come in many styles Courtesy Button Country.

Courtesy Portable Antiquities Scheme. Spanish metal button dating from about to Courtesy Button Country. Campaign button for Abraham Lincoln, Library of Congress. Stringing buttons from button molds in a crowded Massachusetts home, September An patent for leather and paper buttons. Black glass buttons. An early 20th century art nouveau steel button hook with a sterling silver handle. Sobebunny via Wikimedia Commons.

A fabric-printed garter button, used by flappers to hold up their newly visible stockings. The Wild Variety of Buttons Related article: The Simple, Humble, Surprisingly Sexy Button The buttons shown here, culled from the wonderfully abundant galleries at Button Country , demonstrate the wide range of materials used to make these ubiquitous fasteners.

Fabric Buttons The top one shown front and back uses woven tatting and ribbon. Enamel Buttons Related article: Load Comments. Powered by Livefyre. Slate logo Sign In Sign Up.

Here are two interesting guides to shanks. I'm actively looking for the sources so I can credit these. billsbuttondating. Stanley J. Olsen entitled “Dating Early Plain. 's #Colonial Flat Buttons from Charleston West Ashley, SC area January 14, Standing Liberty Quarter (silver) Couldn't get the date off this one.

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Jones, of the 6th Massachusetts. The trick in cleaning these is to preserve as much of the remaining gilt as possible while removing the dirt and other buildup from the button. Just scrubbing with soap and water can cause unnecessary loss of remaining gilt. Until you are confident, practice on dug buttons with little or no value to refine your technique. If you have a fragile button, one that is unstable or has cracks, missing pieces or has major deterioration, it is also a good idea to barely rinse it off, leave it alone, or have a professional look at it.

The Button: A Visual History of the World’s Sexiest Fastening

The button—with its self-contained roundness and infinite variability—has a quiet perfection to it. Running a cascade of buttons through your fingers feels satisfyingly heavy, like coins or candy; their clicking whoosh and blur of colors lull you. A button packs an extraordinary amount of information about a given time and place—its provenance—onto a crowded little canvas. The earliest known button, writes Ian McNeil in An Encyclopedia of the History of Technology , "was originally used more as an ornament than as a fastening, the earliest known being found at Mohenjo-daro in the Indus Valley [now Pakistan]. It is made of a curved shell and about years old. Along with brooches, buckles, and straight pins, buttons were used in ancient Rome as decorative closures for flowing garments. However, none of these options worked perfectly. Pins poked unsightly holes into precious fabrics. Supporting yards of cloth at a single point required buttons of architectural heft, made of bone, horn, bronze or wood. Some designs took the functional pressure off buttons by knotting the fabric securely into position, then topping off the look with a purely ornamental button.

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F rom ca. Some of these typologies remained in use by local, "urban" militia until the end of the Spanish colonial period in These forms cannot, therefore, be neatly defined temporally as being "First Dominion," "Louisiana Period," or "Second Dominion" typologies, several types having seen use during two or all three of these periods. Reenactors portraying the St.

1700's Colonial Flat Buttons

Jan Location: Indiana Posts: I have found a few plated buttons and they were all from areas that were being used somewhere in the 's's. Jun Posts: The thin, flat buttons with the braised on shank and blank backmarks to ones with one word or picture all date from the 's. I have ones that only say 'Gilt' or 'Plated' like yours, and others that have a picture of an Eagle or a Wreath In the early 's the buttons got thicker and carried more writing on the back, such as yours saying 'Orange Colour' I can't read the top, but I'm guessing either a Company's name or 'Treble Guilt' or something. The large Colonials were only made from the mid to late 's. Here's a link to see some button backmarks and help you date any that match. Apr Location: Farmland Indiana Posts:

How to Clean Historical Buttons Dug Metal Detecting

Editor's Note: The preservation of finds is every detectorist's responsibility. Proper cleaning can be an important part of that process, but whatever the method, it should always be accompanied by appropriate caution. First practice on items of little or no value until you have perfected your technique and are confident that it can be safely employed to good effect on better finds. Remember, too, that results may not be reversible; and for that and other reasons, many collectors and conservators may prefer that certain items remain uncleaned. There is excellent information in the following article.

Dating Buttons by Shank Style and Material

I recently purchased 10 pounds of vintage buttons. The seller said they were old but I didn't realize just how old they were. There were many yellow and brown toned buttons that I am pretty sure used to be white. There were buttons ripped off of old clothes, and the small ripped pieces of fabric definitely looked to be from decades past. There were a few that had cracked apart.

Пуля задела Беккера в бок, когда он уже почти обогнул угол здания. Он почувствовал это лишь после того, как сделал пять или шесть шагов. Сначала это напомнило сокращение мышцы чуть повыше бедра, затем появилось ощущение чего-то влажного и липкого. Увидев кровь, Беккер понял, что ранен. Боли он не чувствовал и продолжал мчаться вперед по лабиринтам улочек Санта-Круса. Халохот настойчиво преследовал свою жертву.

Но чего еще можно было ждать от Танкадо - что он сохранит кольцо для них, будучи уверенным в том, что они-то его и убили. И все же Сьюзан не могла поверить, что Танкадо допустил бы. Ведь он был пацифистом и не стремился к разрушению. Он лишь хотел, чтобы восторжествовала правда. Это касалось ТРАНСТЕКСТА. Это касалось и права людей хранить личные секреты, а ведь АНБ следит за всеми и каждым.

Уничтожение банка данных АНБ - акт агрессии, на которую, была уверена Сьюзан, Танкадо никогда бы не пошел.

Послышался голос с сильным немецким акцентом: - Ja. Беккер молчал. - Ja. Дверь слегка приоткрылась, и на него уставилось круглое немецкое лицо. Дэвид приветливо улыбнулся. Он не знал, как зовут этого человека.

AT Pro colonial flat button
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