Dating cia agent

Dating cia agent

How do I know this person is really in the CIA, and if this email is legitimate? Is it safe to submit my personal information? If you, like many Americans, are looking for love online, be careful. Unfortunately, our security officers have been hearing more frequently about this particular con. These con artists go onto dating sites and chat up potential victims, pretending to look for love or a date. He or she weaves a sorry tale about being a super-secret CIA officer working on a dangerous mission overseas, and then drops the devastating news:

What it’s really like to date a spy

Hollywood has produced some incredibly entertaining portrayals of the lives of CIA officers. The veil of secrecy surrounding the work of real-life intelligence officers lends itself to speculation, and the gaps created are quickly filled in with fiction. These fictional depictions often lead to the solidification of the inaccurate perspectives that most people have of the CIA.

It may surprise some to discover that we are not the gun-toting, globetrotting, martini-drinking spies frequently portrayed on the silver screen. By direction of the president in Executive Order of , and in accordance with procedures approved by the Attorney General, the CIA is restricted in the collection of intelligence information directed against US citizens.

Collection is allowed only for an authorized intelligence purpose; for example, if there is a reason to believe that an individual is involved in espionage or international terrorist activities. The CIA's procedures require senior approval for any such collection that is allowed, and, depending on the collection technique employed, the sanction of the Director of National Intelligence and Attorney General may be required. These restrictions have been in effect since the s.

The CIA does not collect information concerning the domestic activities of US citizens, but its foreign intelligence collection mission can be conducted anywhere. Citizens who work for the CIA are officers — not agents or spies. All employees, from operations officers, to analysts, to librarians and public affairs, are considered CIA officers. So, who is a CIA agent? Our operations officers recruit well-placed human assets with access to information.

These spies are agents. They provide critical information about their country to help America. Operations officers are CIA employees who spot, recruit, and handle foreign agents. They are experts in understanding human nature, emotions, intentions, and motivations. The information they provide plays a critical role in developing and implementing US foreign and national security policy. Spies risk imprisonment, the loss of their job, reputation, or family and friends.

Some are even at risk of execution if caught. Some people who work for the CIA recruit and handle agents, which is the job of an operations officer. While the number of employees at CIA is classified, we can tell you that the variety of careers here is similar to that of a major corporation. CIA officers work as analysts , scientists, engineers, economists, linguists, mathematicians, secretaries, accountants, computer specialists, targeting officers, inventors, developers, cartographers, cyber exploitation officers, architects, data engineers, IT technicians, human resources, auditors, psychologists, environmental safety officers, nurses, physicians, psychiatrists, cyber security officers, security protective service federal police officers, polygraph examiners, attorneys, paralegals, logistics officers, researchers, communications officers, editors, graphic designers, videographers, instructors, automotive mechanics, librarians, historians, museum curators, and more!

While some officers do live undercover, many do not. And while some of us may be able to confirm that we work for the CIA, we may have to deny you details. Actually, for the majority of our officers, working at the CIA is very similar to working any other nine-to-five job in terms of logistics and lifestyle.

CIA officers lead typical lives — we have kids and pets, we workout at the gym, watch movies, eat out, spend time with friends, and do volunteer work. We come from a variety of backgrounds and an array of educational expertise. The two agencies work closely together, but their roles in keeping America safe are very different. The CIA is not a law enforcement agency. The CIA's responsibility is to collect intelligence and information overseas. When conducting our mission overseas, we take steps to safeguard any information on Americans that could be incidentally collected.

The FBI is the government agency that investigates crimes on American soil and against American citizens abroad. The vast majority of CIA officers do not carry weapons. Aside from officers in the Security Protective Service, or those serving in war zones, most CIA officers will never be issued a gun. The CIA is responsible to the American people. We operate in accordance with oversight from US elected representatives. In the Executive Branch, the National Security Council NSC —which includes the president, vice president, secretary of state, and secretary of defense—provides guidance and direction for national foreign intelligence and counterintelligence activities.

Internally, the CIA Office of Inspector General performs independent audits, inspections, investigations, and reviews of CIA programs and operations, seeking to detect and deter fraud, waste, abuse, and mismanagement. The resources allocated to the CIA are subject to the same rigorous examination and approval process that applies to all other government organizations. They do it out of a deep love and commitment to country.

The officers of the CIA are guided by a professional ethos that includes Service — putting our Nation first, Agency before unit, and mission before self and Stewardship — protecting sources and methods from the moment we enter on duty until our last breath. When adhering to these principles there is no room for fame or recognition. The CIA does not make policy; it is an independent source of foreign intelligence information for those who do.

The CIA works to close intelligence gaps with enhanced collection and analysis on countries, non-state actors, and issues most critical to the president, US policymakers, the US military, and other key members of the Intelligence Community. Speaking a foreign language is not a prerequisite for working at the CIA and not all Agency employees are bilingual.

However, the ability to speak, translate, and interpret foreign languages is vital to the mission of the Agency and the CIA does have employees with language skills to handle both current national security requirements and potential new missions. The CIA values foreign language skills and has a comprehensive language incentive program that fosters the acquisition and maintenance of foreign language skills.

CIA has one of the most advanced foreign language teaching laboratories in the world, staffed by exceptional linguists and instructors. Working at the CIA does not grant you unlimited access to government secrets. In other words, an officer will not have access to classified information unless it pertains directly to their job duties. We read every letter, fax, or e-mail we receive, and we will convey your comments to CIA officials outside OPA as appropriate.

However, with limited staff and resources, we simply cannot respond to all who write to us. Submit questions or comments online. By postal mail: Contact the Office of Privacy and Civil Liberties. Contact the Office of Inspector General. Contact the Employment Verification Office. Please check our site map , search feature, or our site navigation on the left to locate the information you seek. We do not routinely respond to questions for which answers are found within this Web site.

We do not routinely answer questions about employment beyond the information on this Web site, and we do not routinely answer inquiries about the status of job applications. Recruiting will contact applicants within 45 days if their qualifications meet our needs. People from nearly every country share information with CIA, and new individuals contact us daily.

If you have information you think might interest CIA due to our foreign intelligence collection mission, there are many ways to reach us. If you know of an imminent threat to a location inside the U. For threats outside the U. Embassy or Consulate and ask for the information to be passed to a U. Please know, CIA does not engage in law enforcement. In addition to the options below, individuals contact CIA in a variety of creative ways.

The best method depends on your personal situation. We will work to protect all information you provide, including your identity, and our interactions with you will be respectful and professional. Depending on what you provide, we may offer you compensation. We cannot guarantee a response to every message. We reply first to messages of greater interest to us and to those with more detail. Our response will occur via a secure method.

Send a message here. We go to great lengths to keep this channel secure, but any communication via the internet poses some risk. You can also mail a letter to a U. Embassy or Consulate and request it be forwarded to CIA. Please note we have no control over the security and reliability of postal mail. Outside the U. Embassy or Consulate and inform a U. Third Party: Have someone you trust travel to a less restrictive environment and deliver the information via one of the above methods.

Myth 1: Myth 2: Myth 3: All CIA officers recruit and handle agents Some people who work for the CIA recruit and handle agents, which is the job of an operations officer. Myth 4: All CIA officers are quiet, mysterious, live undercover and lie about where they work While some officers do live undercover, many do not. Myth 5: Myth 6: The Agency operates independently and is not held accountable to anyone The CIA is responsible to the American people.

Myth 7: Myth 8: The CIA makes foreign policy The CIA does not make policy; it is an independent source of foreign intelligence information for those who do. Myth 9: All CIA officers are fluent in multiple languages Speaking a foreign language is not a prerequisite for working at the CIA and not all Agency employees are bilingual. Myth

The CIA’s mission is to collect information related to foreign intelligence and foreign counterintelligence. The FBI has the lead on intelligence matters in the United States, especially those directed against US citizens. Citizens who work for the CIA are officers – not agents. Dear Molly, I met someone on an online dating site who says he's a CIA officer, but I don't know if he's telling me the truth. The more we talked.

The Internet Movie Database Your boss is caught in the act of "going at it" with a junior colleague, and it's perfectly acceptable. For Gerecht, espionage is a loose culture, populated by "bottom feeders," and is better left alone if America wants good intelligence. When I was in the agency, my colleagues were amused, occasionally disappointed, but never shocked when married officers were discovered cavorting with their secretaries or other co-workers at the office, in parking lots, hotels, and safe-houses—which, of course, are not supposed to be used for trysts.

When Emily Brandwin joined the CIA, she quickly realized that the skills that made her colleagues great agents also made them terrible boyfriends…. Sharethrough Mobile.

Skip navigation! Story from Movies. Emily Brandwin was a theater major living in her childhood bedroom in St.

Data Protection Choices

When so much of their lives remain secret, what do CIA agents tell their families? Government agents already have a lot on their plates, from intense and unpredictable daily schedules to physically and mentally rigorous training. Thankfully, agency protocol makes it possible for CIA agents to lead normal lives. Like everyone else, CIA agents date, marry, and raise kids, in addition to maintaining relationships with friends and family. With so much of their lives shrouded in secrecy, how do CIA agents maintain a personal life? CIA officers report being able to share their job titles and sometimes the geographic areas they work in, but not much beyond that.

CIA Agents Sleep Around All The Time, Says Ex-Spook

Hollywood has produced some incredibly entertaining portrayals of the lives of CIA officers. The veil of secrecy surrounding the work of real-life intelligence officers lends itself to speculation, and the gaps created are quickly filled in with fiction. These fictional depictions often lead to the solidification of the inaccurate perspectives that most people have of the CIA. It may surprise some to discover that we are not the gun-toting, globetrotting, martini-drinking spies frequently portrayed on the silver screen. By direction of the president in Executive Order of , and in accordance with procedures approved by the Attorney General, the CIA is restricted in the collection of intelligence information directed against US citizens. Collection is allowed only for an authorized intelligence purpose; for example, if there is a reason to believe that an individual is involved in espionage or international terrorist activities. The CIA's procedures require senior approval for any such collection that is allowed, and, depending on the collection technique employed, the sanction of the Director of National Intelligence and Attorney General may be required. These restrictions have been in effect since the s. The CIA does not collect information concerning the domestic activities of US citizens, but its foreign intelligence collection mission can be conducted anywhere. Citizens who work for the CIA are officers — not agents or spies.

When you hear the word 'spy', your imagination likely conjures up images of James Bond in a sharp suit, wielding weapons and seducing everyone in the room over a martini. In reality, Emily Brandwin - with a background in improvised comedy and a totally unrelated university degree - is the one doing the spying.

Meanwhile, usa today published 5: Cia and begins the agency cia officer paula broadwell.

'How I balanced being a secret CIA spy with having a normal life'

By Daily Mail Reporter. Anyone who is married or has been married knows how difficult it can be and how much work is needed to make it a success. But imagine being one half of a marriage that is shrouded in secrecy, where your husband feels he has a right to keep things from you, where you're not allowed to ask any questions and even start to convince your self the whole relationship may just be a cover. This is what being married to someone in the CIA is like, according to one Fredericksburg woman who is in the midst of a messy divorce. Laid bare: Sealed court documents expose what life married to a CIA agent is like, where one woman complained her husband used her as a front. She claims in the court-sealed documents that her husband's job as a covert operations officer poisoned their five-year marriage and broke up the family. In the documents obtained by the Washington Post , she wrote: She continued that she couldn't trust anyone and didn't have a support network as she was so paranoid about those around her. Her husband never helped out around the house either, she claimed. When the woman, who is in her her thirties, met her husband on an online dating website in , he told her he was with the State Department.

'How I balanced being a secret CIA spy with having a normal life'

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News & Information

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Wife spills secrets of nightmare marriage to CIA agent in divorce papers

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CIA Agents Sleep Around All The Time, Says Ex-Spook

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Former CIA Agent Talks Double Life
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